Nutrition for Persons with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities



Nutrition for Persons with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities


People with intellectual/developmental disabilities often have a higher tendency of being obese than people in the general population. For ideas on how to improve nutrition in persons with Down syndrome, see the NCHPAD factsheet at /165/1278/Down~Syndrome~and~Nutrition.

 

General Recommendations for maintaining or losing weight include:

  • Eat a diet low in saturated fat. See the American Dietetic Association factsheet at American Dietetic Association; /259/1674/The~5~to~9-A-Day~Challenge).
    • Watch portion control (/81/595/Estimating~Serving~Sizes).
    • Read labels to choose foods that comprise a healthful diet (/84/621/Food~Labels). For example, be aware of the distinction of the following keyword labels:
      • fat-free: less than .5 grams of fat per serving
      • low-fat: 3 grams of fat (or less) per serving
      • lean: less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams of saturated fat, and no more than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving
      • light (lite): one-third less calories or no more than half the fat of the higher-calorie, higher-fat version; or no more than half the sodium of the higher-sodium version
      • cholesterol-free: less than 2 milligrams of cholesterol and 2 grams (or less) of saturated fat per serving

 

Please send your comments and feedback to Valerie Lawson at vlawson@uic.edu.






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